Archivo de la etiqueta: traceable medicine

Traceable Medicine

This bizz takes elements of several others described here.

 

Medicine has always been defined as part art, part science. Art resists definition and can not be traced, while science is the opposite. As a part-time practicing doctor, I know that Medical care is far from being exact science and the doctor-patient interaction is hardly traceable. We doctors enjoy certain impunity from the fact that not everything we do and advice is recorded, and our errors most of the times, get covered with dirt… Even those facts that get written can be left in paper or in electronic format that is not integrated in larger databases.

 

For instance, let’s compare several parts of patient-doctor interaction, in the old and modern ways of doing medicine:

 

 

Standard-traditional-Old Way

Connected-traceable-telework-New Way

Patient selects Doctor

Word of mouth

Advertising

Managed care org. decides

Whoever is available

Verifiable CV

Knowledge Marketplace

Doctor selects patient

Clinicians accept everyone

Specialists accept patients broadly within their specialty

 

Doctors search for patients in knowledge (medical service) marketplaces, which assure they stay within their proven abilities.

Initial interview

Spoken

Spoken + Audio record + full data entry in EMR. Telemedicine.

Medical Records

Paper or single PC

Electronic Medical Record  (EMR) in a Database

Data collection

Analogical forms (paper, X Ray film, thermo sensitive paper)

Digital forms integrated into the EMR

Medical decisions

Doctor’ call. Hunch. Coin toss. Infrequently, second medical opinion sought. Many times, from a friend or the first doctor who walks around.

Software assisted. Expert systems. Knowledge Marketplace. Telemedicine. Online qualification system for medical acts.

Outcome

Hopefully, everything Ok. Doctor performance is approximately estimated by those few that happen to know the case.

Permanently monitored by the Online Qualification System for Medical Acts.

 

 

Special examples of Traceable Medicine are clinical trials. When companies need to test new products or treatments define tests with extreme control of every variable, write strict protocols and appoint experts that ensure compliance. Everything is traceable. The results are solid enough to allow researchers to extract valid conclusions of general value.

 

Traceable Medicine will push health care away from art and into science. The result will be a less human patient-doctor relationship, but without doubt, success rates will be better and costs lower.

 

The “Online Qualification System for Medical Acts” does not exist and is a business by itself. It requires the EMR, for every participant being able to check patient data. Let’s show some properties:

 

  • can be complemented by Verifiable CVs, because the ratings that doctors obtain in this system can be added (if good…) to their CVs.

 

  • would be a useful Medical Marketing tool for the service providers in the Medical Knowledge Marketplace, because those with a good record can be trusted and sell themselves better.

 

  • will add credibility for those who participate in the Medical Social Networks.

 

  • will be able to run Contests (with many marketing opportunities). Of course, the patient will stay anonymous.

 

  • will be able to provide Certifications (a new business)

 

  • instead of passing tests, obtaining certifications and solving quizzes for free or paying a fee, Doctors will do it and at the same time, get paid for their work

 

  • large amounts of valuable data will be available for Public Health and Epidemiology technicians and experts, which will greatly improve Health Care in general.

 

 

Personal View

I envision huge resistance from doctors to accept traceable medicine. They still fiercely resist using PCs to keep appointments and data. And the pen and paper generation still rules over the young and connected.

We doctors enjoy certain impunity from the fact that not everything we do and advice is recorded, and our errors most of the times, get covered with dirt